Ignore the Hispanic Vote at Your Own Peril

By Matt Sarge

There is often talk about how critical the Hispanic vote is, and the impact of this growing demographic really can not be overstated. Not only is the Latino demographic is America growing rapidly via immigration and higher birth rates, but it also has a slightly different average ideology than rest of the Democratic coalition. Though Hispanic voters are overwhelmingly Democratic, helping secure an Obama victory in 2012, they are not (on average) overwhelmingly liberal. Setting aside the immigration issue, Hispanic voters are more religious and therefore, often, more socially conservative. If the GOP can neutralize the immigration issue, there is some potential for better performance amongst this young and growing voting bloc. Regardless, the unique blend of ideology in this demographic group provides a huge opportunity for effective micro-targeting. By delivering the right mix of messages, potentially a very different mix than to other parts of the electorate, either party could stand to benefit from a flood of new voters. Not only is the Hispanic vote big currently, but it is growing rapidly and is underrepresented in turnout. If either party wants to remain viable nationally, paying attention to the complex policy preference set of Hispanic voters, and targeting accordingly, is a must.

Compelling Stats and Infographics

How the NSA’s PRISM data collection program might work. [source: Ashkan Soltani’s blog and Mashable]

How the NSA’s PRISM data collection program might work. [source: Ashkan Soltani’s blog and Mashable]

To follow up on our earlier post about the size of government and federal spending, here’s a detailed look at President Obama’s 2014 budget request, in infographic form.

To follow up on our earlier post about the size of government and federal spending, here’s a detailed look at President Obama’s 2014 budget request, in infographic form.

Evolution of SXSW [INFOGRAPHIC]

We like infographics

Fiscal cliff redux

By Nick Davis

This month Congress averted the fiscal cliffmageddontastrophe by a 11th hour and 59th minute passage of a makeshift bill to avert massive tax increases and spending cuts. 

With all of these big numbers and terms like ‘sequestration’ flying around, it can be difficult for many people to wrap their head around all of it; 800 hundred million billion, anyone?

What we do know is that when George Bush passed a series of tax cuts in 2001 and 2003 the national debt started going up. Differing sources have debated the effectiveness of these cuts to promote economic growth. The Heritage Foundation has claimed that these cuts have paid for themselves while the Center For Budget and Policy Priorities have disputed these claims. Either way you look at, there’s no doubt that the federal debt took a sharp uptick after these cuts and it hasn’t looked back since.

With the national debt hovering around 16 trillion our government set itself a deadline to implement a savings plan to reduce the debt or else the nation would run itself off the fiscal cliff. The deadline was supposed to be an armageddon-like scenario that no reasonable elected official from any party would want to have expire, thereby forcing a comprehensive, bi-partisan solution to the fiscal problems. Of course that did not happen. 

The inforgraphic above gives a sense of how landmark the deal that was struck this month actually was, in comparison to your typical household budget. As you can see we have not really reduced the debt. We’ve reduced the rate at which the debt is increasing. These spending cuts are just a drop in the bucket, but instead of a bucket, think swimming pool. In addition, the sequestration measures I talked about earlier were delayed 2 months in order to allow for further negotiation, also aligning with the same general time frame that we’ll once again reach our debt ceiling. Great.

Ok, let’s take a second to recap.  Each year we add $16,500 to the family budget. The new revenues raised by the tax restoration in the most recent legislation amounts to about 2% of our family income while we cut $3.85 each year. I don’t think anyone thinks that’s a recipe for financial success at the individual or federal level. It’s our politicians make some real sacrifices and tough decisions if we ever want to gain control of our debt problem.

Rural Urban Divide in America [INFOGRAPHIC]

via The Atlantic

Red/Blue electoral map that shows population on the Z -axis

Red/Blue electoral map distorted by area. You can see big blue counties surrounded by lots of smaller red counties

Emerging “mega-regions” which are starting to become more significant than cities

Complexity of same sex-unions across America. 

Politics of media and books, via @Buzzfeed

I’m wondering where readers of Dianetics by L Ron Hubbard fall on this scale. 

JOBS Act Survey [Infographic]

Here is the info graphic from the JOBS Act survey we ran during SXSW.

SXVOTIFI Results

The Votifi polling machine has been busy crunching numbers from our SXVOTIF poll (have your voice heard at votifi.com/sxsw). Here are the results after a week of polling on some of the questions. We’ll update with more results throughout the Festival